Social Movements & Civil Society
 

 Here is a brief overview of the module Social Movements and Civil Society. A detailed handbook will be distributed at the first seminar.

 

 

 

 

Module

Handbook

 

 

 

 

SY1014 – Social Movements and Civil Society

 

 

Lecturer:   Prof. Carlo Ruzza

Room:       502 Attenborough Tower

Tel:            (0116) 252 5359

E-mail:      cr145@le.ac.uk

 

 


 

IMPORTANT – PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

 

 

When handing in your Summative Assignments you must adhere to the following instructions:

 

 

 

 HANDING IN PROCEDURES FOR 1st YEAR STUDENTS

 

 

Summative Assignments

 

·         Complete the relevant coversheet and staple the form to the front of your work.  Make sure that you complete all the items on the form.

 

·         Make sure that you put the correct Student Number (9 digit number) on the form, if you are not sure you can check with the secretary on the 3rd floor in the Attenborough Tower in room 311.

 

·         Hand in the Summative Assignments to Val Findlay in room 308, 3rd floor of the Attenborough Tower.

 

·         ALL Summative Assignments should also be submitted to Blackboard (where they will be checked by JICS for Plagiarism). If you experience any problems with Blackboard, please email hg17@le.ac.uk.

 

 

SUBMISSION DATES

 

           

Summative Assignments:  Thursday 26th March 2009, 2.00.pm.

 

.

 

Summative Assignments handed after the above deadlines will incur a late penalty, as specified in the Undergraduate Student Handbook            

 

 

 


University of Leicester

            Department of Sociology

 

SY1014:  Social Movements and Civil Society

 

 

SEMESTER:        1

 

LECTURER:         Prof. Carlo Ruzza

                                    

Module Outline

 

This module will provide a basic background on the institutional and political structure of contemporary European societies.

 

The first part of the module will introduce students to theories of state, citizenship and forms of political participation and the process of European integration.

 

The second part of the module will look at examples of political participation including political protest. We will provide examples from environmental, peace, anti-racist, nationalist and ethno-nationalist movements (such as Scottish regionalism).

 

Module Objectives:

 

  • On completion of this module students are expected to be
  • Familiar with contemporary debates on aspects of the institutional structures of European states, such as their welfare regimes, decision-making structures, prevalent forms of political participation including protest, functions of different types of civil society organizations.
  • Relate these debates to sociological questions concerning social and political values in different European countries.
  • Be able to demonstrate an ability to think, discuss and write about these debates critically and sociologically

 

Skills Development:

 

The intellectual and transferable skills students should have acquired on completion of the module are:

  • Develop research finding skills, IT research and study skills
  • Develop clear writing and communication skills, including oral and debating skills through participation in debates and seminars
  • Experience of working with, evaluating and analysing different sources of information (such as media reports, research and reports from Non-Government Organizations, academic research)
  • Develop a good level of independent critical thinking of debates and sources
  • Develop an ability to think arguments through clearly and logically and express them to others
  • Develop a level of self awareness and social understanding
  • Work independently and use their initiative and intellectual curiosity to develop an argument on a selected topic

 

Learning and Teaching Methods

 

18 lectures, 8 seminars

 

Lectures will provide you with an overview of the main issues. You are expected to attend every lecture.

 

Weekly seminars will give you the opportunity to discuss your thinking and writing with a small group of fellow-students. You are required to attend every seminar. Please bear in mind that attendance is still required in lectures and classes close to summative deadlines.

 

The module is taught by two lectures (beginning in Week 1) and one seminar each week

 

Lectures will provide you with an overview of the main issues. You are expected to attend every lecture.

 

Weekly seminars will give you the opportunity to discuss your thinking and writing with a small group of fellow-students. We will be pleased to meet with students individually to discuss their work during our Drop-in Office Hours, which are posted on Blackboard.

 

Reading. You will only derive the full benefit from lectures and seminars if, week by week, you read the Key Reading listed in the schedule of topics. The Supplementary Reading is intended to assist with essays and with examination revision.

 

Blackboard. Module material, such as a copy of this Module Handbook, lecture slides and past examination papers, some readings, and any notices to students relating to the Module will be placed on Blackboard. You are therefore advised to consult Blackboard regularly. Please note that lecture slides are simply an outline, not a full summary of the lectures. They are therefore not a substitute for lecture attendance. 

 

 

Methods of Assessment

 

Formative Assessment is by an extended outline of your essay. The submission date for the formative assignment is Monday 2nd March 2009 no later than 2.00pm.  The assignment should be approximately two typed pages in length and provide an extended outline of the chosen essay title.

 

Summative Assessment is by a two hour examination in May/June (50% of the module mark) and by an essay (50% of the module mark), which requires you to write an essay. The submission for the summative assignment is Thursday 26th March 2009 no later than 2.00pm.

Word Length: Marks will be deducted if essay go over the 2,000-2,500 word length by any amount.

 

ALL summative assignments must be submitted to Blackboard (where they will be checked by JICS for Plagiarism).  If you experience any problems with Blackboard, please email Helena Gorse - hg17@le.ac.uk.

 

Feed-back Arrangements

 

Feedback on essays will be provided in seminars in Week 10. See the Sociology Department Student Handbook for details.

 

Plagiarism

 

Plagiarism is using the work of others as if it were your own. All written work must be your own work. You must not copy from other students, or from the published (or unpublished) work of others.  Whenever you make use of books, articles, internet or other source material, you must make this clear by the appropriate use of references and, where a passage is cited word for word, by the use of quotation marks. Plagiarism is a serious offence and is regarded in the same light as cheating in examinations.  It is likely to result in failure and a mark of 0 for the whole module, and can lead to disciplinary action. See the section on plagiarism in the Undergraduate Student Handbook. If you are, in any doubt you are advised to talk to your personal tutor or module teachers. Useful advice on how to avoid it is available at  http://www.le.ac.uk/teaching/writtencommunicationguides.html

 

 

Visiting Students
Visiting students need to make themselves known to the Module Leader and Seminar Tutor right away, especially if they are unlikely to be present for the Examination which is part of the assessment for this module.

It is expected that all students will sit examinations, but negotiations on special cases for visiting students can also be undertaken, but only if prior notice is given.

 

General Module

 

 

Main Readings

JANOSKI, T. (2005) The handbook of political sociology: states, civil societies, and globalization, Cambridge, Cambridge, (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 306.2)

 

NASH, K. & SCOTT, A. (2004) The Blackwell companion to political sociology, Oxford, Blackwell, (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 306.2)

 

Supplementary Readings

 

BHAMBRA, G. K. & DEMIR, I. (Eds.) (2009) 1968 in Retrospect History, Theory, Alterity

London, Palgrave Macmillan,  (Leicester Library: on order)

 

Burmer, M., Rees, A., (Eds.) (1996) Citizenship Today. London, UCL Press (Leicester Library: 323.6 MAR)

 

Crouch, C., K. Eder, et al., Eds. (2001). Citizenship, Markets, and the State. Oxford, Oxford University Press. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

 

EDWARDS, M. (2004) Civil society, Cambridge, Polity. (Leicester Library: JC337 Edw.)

 

FABBRINI, S. (Ed.) The United States Contested: American Unilateralism and European Discontent. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order).

 

GAMSON, W. A. (1992) Talking politics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 303.38 GAM)

 

HALL, J. A. & TRENTMANN, F. (2005) Civil society : a reader in history, theory and global politics, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 320.1 CIV) - Chapter 10 “Modernity, late development and civil society” by Nicos Mouzelis

 

MAZZOLENI, G., STEWART, J. & HORSFIELD, B. (2003) The media and neo-populism : a contemporary comparative analysis, Westport, Conn. ; London, Praeger. (Leicester Library: 324.73)

MISZTAL, B. (2001) Civil Society: a Signifier of Plurality and Sense of Wholeness. IN BLAU, J. (Ed.) The Blackwell Companion to Sociology. Cambridge, Blackwell. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 301 BLA)

 

MORRIS, L. (Ed.) Sociology and Rights. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

Powell, F. W. (2007) The politics of civil society : neoliberalism or social left? Bristol, Policy Press (Leicester Library: 361.25 POW)

Ritzer, G. (2003). Sociological Theory. NY, McGraw-Hill (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 301.01 RIT)

 

RUGGIERO, V. & MONTAGNA, N. (2008) Social movements : a reader, New York, NY, Routledge, (Leicester Library: 303.484 SOC)

 

TODD, M. J. & TAYLOR, G. (2004) Democracy and participation : popular protest and new social movements, London, Merlin. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 323.042 DEM )

Lecture programme:  Outline at a glance

Week

Title

Main lecture reading

Seminar Readings

(Week 1) Lecture one

Introduction

 

No seminar

(Week 1) Lecture two

Perspectives on power: Weberian and Marxist perspectives

Section 1:  State, Citizenship, Europe

Weber in Ritzer

(Week 2) Lecture three

Theories of state formation

Ertman in Janoski p. 367

Scott ‘Studying power’ in Nash and Scott, p. 8

 

Poggi ‘Theories of state formation’ in Nash and Scott, p. 95

(Week 2) Lecture four

State building, Nation and Nationalism

Greenfeld in Janoski 247

 

Schwarzmantel in Nash and Scott, p. 386

(Week 3) Lecture five

Citizenship

Procacci, Governmentality and Citizenship in Nash and Scott, p. 342

Lister ‘Citizenship and gender’ in Nash and Scott, p. 323

 

Soysal ‘postnational citizenship’ in Nash and Scott 333

(Week 3) Lecture six

European welfare state models

Hicks and Esping Anderson in Janoski 509

 

Conflict theories in political sociology in Janoski  79

(Week 4) Lecture seven

Globalisation, European Integration, regionalisation and governance

McMichael, Globalisation in Janoski, p. 587

 

Rumford, C. (2002). The European Union: a political sociology. Oxford, Blackwell Publishers. Ch 2

Peter John ‘Policy Networks’, in Nash and Scott 139

 

Le Galès ‘A new phase of the state story in Europe’, in Nash and Scott, p. 396

(Week 4) Lecture eight

Administration, civil service and Democracy;

 

European Integration

Palumbo in Nash and Scott 127

 

Rumford, C. (2002). The European Union : a political sociology. Oxford, Blackwell Publishers. Ch 3

 

(Week 5) Lecture nine

Trust and social capital

Section 2: social and political participation

 

MISZTAL, B. A. (1996) Trust in modern societies : the search for the bases of social order, Cambridge, Cambridge, Mass., Polity Press ;Blackwell. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 301)

 

Bagnasco ‘Trust and social capital’ in Nash and Scott, p. 230

 

Norval ‘The politics of ethnicity and identity’ in Nash and Scott, p. 271

(Week 5) Lecture ten

Collective Identities; Ehnicity and Identity

Sanders, J. M. (2002). "Ethnic Boundaries and Identity in Plural Societies." Annu. Rev. Sociol. 28: 327-57.

 

(Week 6) Lecture eleven

Public Opinion and the role of the media

Schudson and Waistbord in Janoski 350

Thompson ‘The media and politics’ in Nash and Scott 173

 

Ray ‘Civil society and the public sphere’ in Nash and Scott, 219

(Week 6) Lecture twelve

Civil society and the public sphere

MISZTAL, B. (2001) Civil Society: a Signifier of Plurality and Sense of Wholeness. IN BLAU, J. (Ed.) The Blackwell Companion to Sociology. Cambridge, Blackwell. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

HALL, J. A. & TRENTMANN, F. (2005) Civil society : a reader in history, theory and global politics, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 320.1 CIV) Chapter 10

(Week 7) Lecture thirteen

Forms of social and political participation

Manza in Janoski, p. 201

 

Streek and Kenworthy, p. 441

 

Crouch, ‘Markets and States’ in Nash and Scott, p. 240

 

Kitshelt, ‘Parties and political intermediation’, in Nash and Scott p. 149

(Week 7) Lecture fourteen

Private and public interest groups

Granados and Knoke in Janoski, p. 287

(Week 8) Lecture fifteen

Social Movement theories; Culture, emotions and social movements

Jenkins and Form in Janoski, ‘Social movements and social change’  p. 331

Mayer, ‘protest and political processes’, in Nash and Scott, p. 164

 

RUZZA, C. (2004) Peace Movements. IN TAYLOR, G. & TODD, M. (Eds.) Democracy and Participation: Popular Protest and New Social Movements. London, Merlin Press. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 323.042 DEM )

(Week 8) Lecture sixteen

Types of movements: peace movements

RUZZA, C. & BOZZINI, E. (2006) Anti-Americanism and the European Peace Movement: the Iraq war. IN FABBRINI, S. (Ed.) The United States Contested: American Unilateralism and European Discontent. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

(Week 9) Lecture seventeen

Types of movements: the no-global movement

Sanjeev Khagram, James V. Riker and Kathyn Sikkink. 'Transnational Protest and Global Activism' in Ruggiero and Montagna

Section ‘New Global Movements’ In Ruggiero and Montagna: Marjorie Mayo. 'Globalizing Resistance: The Battle of Seattle and the Future of Social Movements'

 

Jackie Smith. 'From Santiago to Seattle: Transnational Advocacy Groups Restructuring World Politics'

(Week 9) Lecture eighteen

Types of movements: the anti-racist movements in institutional settings;

 

Conclusions

RUZZA, C. (2006) Human Rights, Anti racism and EU Advocacy Coalitions. IN MORRIS, L. (Ed.) Sociology and Rights. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

LENTIN, A. (2000) 'Race', Racism and Anti-racism: Challenging Contemporary Classifications. Social Identities,, 6, 106-.(Leicester Library: on order)

(Week 10) Lecture nineteen

Key issues and debates: revision

 

 

 

Lectures Outline

Lecture 1: Introduction

European societies and their institutional framework in recent years.

 

Readings

 

Supplementary Readings

 

 

Section 1 – State, Citizenship, Europe

Lecture 2: Perspectives on power

·         Conceptualisations of power in the main sociological perspectives

·         Weber's theory of cultural rationalization. Fragmentation of the life‑spheres.

 

Readings

Gerth, H., Mills, W., ( 1970) "Religious Rejections of the World and their Directions" in From Max Weber, Routledge

Supplementary Readings

 

LUKES, S. (2004) Power : a radical view, London, Palgrave Macmillan. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 303.3)

Lecture 3: Theories of state formation

·         Theories of state formation

 

Readings

Ertman, T., State Formation and State Building in Europe, in Janoski , p. 367

Supplementary Readings

 

LUKES, S. (2004) Power : a radical view, London, Palgrave Macmillan. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 303.3)

 

Lecture 4: State building, nation and nationalism

·         The parallel process of state building and nation building in Europe and recent evolutions

 

Readings

Greenfeld L., and Jonathan R. Eastwood,  Nationalism in Comparative Perspective, in Janoski  p.  247

Supplementary Readings

Schwarzmantel, Nationalism and fragmentation since 1989, in Nash and Scott 386

 

Lecture 5: Citizenship

·         The meaning of citizenship, historical background, current issues

 

Readings

Procacci, G., Governmentality and Citizenship, in Nash and Scott, p. 342

Supplementary Readings

 

Burmer, M., Rees, A., (Eds.) (1996) Citizenship Today. London, UCL Press (Leicester Library: 323.6 MAR)

 

Lecture 6: European welfare state models; he role of the public sector

·         Welfare state regimes and the consequences for different groups of the population

·         The role of the public sector

 

Readings

 

Hicks and Esping Anderson in Janoski 509

Supplementary Readings

 

Conflict theories in political sociology van den Berg and Janoski  in Janoski  79

 

Lecture 7: Globalisation, European Integration, regionalisation and governance

 

Globalisation and Governance: meaning and European dimensions

 

Readings

 

McMichael, P.,  Globalization,  in Janoski, p. 587

 

Supplementary Readings

 

KEANE, J. (1988) Civil society and the State : new European perspectives, London, Verso. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 320.1 CIV)

Rumford, C. (2002). The European Union : a political sociology. Oxford, Blackwell Publishers. Ch. 2

 

 Lecture 8: The sociology of administration

 

·         Administration, civil service and Democracy

·         European Integration

Readings

 

Palumbo, A., Administration, civil service and democracy, in Nash and Scott, p. 127

 

Supplementary Readings

 

Rumford, C. (2002). The European Union: a political sociology. Oxford, Blackwell Publishers. Ch 3.

 

 

Section on Social and Political Participation

Lecture 9: Trust and social capital

 

·         Trust and social capital

Readings

MISZTAL, B. A. (1996) Trust in modern societies : the search for the bases of social order, Cambridge, Cambridge, Mass., Polity Press ;Blackwell. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 301)

 

Supplementary Readings

 

PISELLI, F. (2007) Social capital and civil society: governing outside the state at the local level. IN RUZZA, C. & SALA, V. D. (Eds.) Governance and Civil Society: Policy Perspectives. Manchester, Manchester University Press. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 323.6094 GOV )

 

Wallace, C., Pichler F.,  Patterns of formal and informal social capital in Europe"(2007)  European Sociological Review, 23 (4) 423-436

 

Lecture 10: Collective Identities

 

·         Collective Identities

·         Social movement identities

·         Ehnicity and Identity

·         The mobilization of ethnicity

 

Readings

 

SANDERS, J. M. (2002) Ethnic Boundaries and Identity in Plural Societies. Annual Review of Sociology, 327-357.

 

Supplementary Readings

 

KEATING, M. (2004) Regions and regionalism in Europe, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 320.94 REG)

HUYSSEUNE, M. (2006) Modernity and secession : the social sciences and the political discourse of the Lega Nord in Italy, New York ; Oxford, Berghahn Books. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 324.245084 HUY)

BHAMBRA, G. K. & DEMIR, I. (Eds.) (2009) 1968 in Retrospect History, Theory, Alterity

London, Palgrave Macmillan,  (Leicester Library: on order)

 

Lecture 11: Public Opinion and the role of the media

 

·         The political role of the media

 

Readings

 

Schudson and Waistbord in Janoski, p. 350

 

Supplementary Readings

 

GAMSON, W. A. & MODIGLIANI, A. (1989) Media Discourse and Public Opinion on Nuclear Power: a Constructionist Approach. American Journal of Sociology, 95, 1-38.

GAMSON, W. A. (1992) Talking politics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 303.38 GAM)

 

MAZZOLENI, G., STEWART, J. & HORSFIELD, B. (2003) The media and neo-populism : a contemporary comparative analysis, Westport, Conn. ; London, Praeger. (Leicester Library: 324.73 21)

 

Lecture 12: Civil society and the public sphere

 

·         Approaches to civil society

·         Active citizenship

·         Third sector and non-profit activities

 

Readings

 

HALL, J. A. & TRENTMANN, F. (2005) Civil society : a reader in history, theory and global politics, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 320.1 CIV)

 

Supplementary Readings

 

Powell, F. W. (2007) The politics of civil society : neoliberalism or social left? Bristol, Policy Press (Leicester Library: 361.25 POW)
    

 

 

Lecture 13: Forms of social and political participation

 

·         Advocacy

Readings

 

Manza in Janoski, p. 201

 

Supplementary Readings

 

Streek and Kenworthy, in Janoski p. 441

 

RUZZA, C. (2007) Europe and civil society, Manchester, Manchester University Press. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 322.4094 RUZ)

Lecture 14: Public and private interest groups in institutional contexts

 

·         Advocacy

·         Judicial activism

Readings

 

Granados and Knoke in Janoski, p. 287

 

Supplementary Readings

 

SANTORO W.A. & MCGUIRE, G. M. (1997) Social movement insiders: The impact of institutional activists on affirmative action and comparable worth policies. Social Problems, 44, 503-519.

 

Lecture 15: Social Movement theories; Culture, emotions and social movements

 

·         Social movement theories

·         Emotions and social movements

Readings

 

Jenkins and Form, ‘Social movements and social change’  in Janoski, p. 331

 

Supplementary Readings

 

FLAM, H. & KING, D. W. (2005) Emotions and social movements, New York, Routledge. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 303.484 EMO)

Lecture 16: Types of movements: peace movements

 

·         Peace movements in the last few decades

·         The anti-nuclear movement

Readings

 

RUZZA, C. & BOZZINI, E. (2006) Anti-Americanism and the European Peace Movement: the Iraq war. IN FABBRINI, S. (Ed.) The United States Contested: American Unilateralism and European Discontent. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

Supplementary Readings

 

RUZZA, C. (1997) Institutionalization in the Italian Peace Movement. Theory and Society, 26, 1-41.

Lecture 17: Types of movements: the no-global movement

 

·         The no-global  movement

Readings

 

Sanjeev Khagram, James V. Riker and Kathyn Sikkink. 'Transnational Protest and Global Activism' in Ruggiero and Montagna

 

Supplementary Readings

 

DOUCET, M. (2004) Global justice and democracy : the anti-globalisation movement, London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: DWL 303.484 DOU)

 

 

Lecture 18: Types of movements: the anti-racist movement

 

·         The anti-racist movement in institutional settings

Readings

 

RUZZA, C. (2006) Human Rights, Anti racism and EU Advocacy Coalitions. IN MORRIS, L. (Ed.) Sociology and Rights. London, Routledge. (Leicester Library: on order)

 

Supplementary Readings

 

LENTIN, A. (2000) 'Race', Racism and Anti-racism: Challenging Contemporary Classifications. Social Identities,, 6, 106-.(Leicester Library: on order)


SEMINAR PRogramme:

 

Readings

 

In each seminar we will cover the contents of two lectures through thematically related readings. They are meant to clarify the approaches discussed in the lectures. Readings for the seminars are short articles from: NASH, K. & SCOTT, A. (2004) The Blackwell companion to political sociology, Oxford, Blackwell. (Leicester Library: DWL 1-ORANGE 306.2 BLA). Several copies are available at the library, and at the book store.

 

Students are expected to have read the materials in advance and be ready to summarise them and discuss the connections to the lectures.  In the course of the discussion we will examine all the articles assigned.

 

In each seminar two students will be ask to present in 10-15 minutes the materials assigned for the week according to the schedule presented in the table on page 7-8 of this handbook . Class discussion will follow.


 

 

Department of Sociology

 

JUNE EXAMINATIONS 2010

 

SY1014 MICROSOCIOLOGY

 

Summative Assignment

 

You are required to write ONE essay selected from the titles below of between 2,000 and 2,500 words.  You should submit your essay, with a completed cover sheet to the First Year Secretary in ATT 308 no later than 2.00 pm on the due date in March 2010 (as specified in Departmental regulations).  Essays should also be submitted to Blackboard. 

 

  • Do not write your name on any part of the essay
  • On the front page include:

a)    your Student Number

b)    the module number

c)    essay question title

d)    a word count (not including the bibliography)

  • Word process your essay:-

a)    set the text at one and a half spaces

b)    format paragraphs clearly, leaving a space after each paragraph

c)   number the pages

  • Reference your essay using the Harvard System
  • Include a correctly set out bibliography

 

Students who fail to follow these guidelines may lose marks.

________________________________________________________________________

 

1. Discuss either the theory of rationalisation or the ideal type of bureaucracy in Max Weber

 

2. What do we mean by ‘welfare state regimes’? Discuss some of the models of European welfare states.

 

3. What is globalization? Discuss with reference to the European Union

 

4. Discuss relations between the state and civil society

 

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